GOOD

Join GOOD Ideas for Cities at the Biennale in Venice, Italy

Our GOOD Ideas for Cities project is representing the U.S. at the 13th International Architecture Biennale in Venice, Italy. Join us on August 29!

Our GOOD Ideas for Cities program has traveled to six American cities in 2012, assigning creative problem-solvers real urban challenges proposed by city leaders and presenting the results at lively public forums. Earlier this year we found out that GOOD Ideas for Cities was selected as one of 124 urban design projects as part of Spontaneous Interventions: design actions for the common good, the exhibition at the U.S. Pavilion at the 13th International Architecture Biennale in Venice, Italy. We could not be more thrilled to be in the company of hundreds of projects from 55 countries all focused on improving our cities through great design—many of which we've covered here on GOOD.


While the exhibition will be up from August 29 until November 25, in the spirit of on-the-ground urban intervention, we're taking GOOD Ideas for Cities international, with a special event at the Biennale on Wednesday, August 29. Join GOOD Ideas for Cities editor Alissa Walker, Ezio Micelli, Venice's deputy mayor for urban planning, and three teams consisting of architects and local leaders, who will address three challenge facing the Venice community. And if you can't make it to Venice, stay tuned for videos and coverage, which will be posted right here.

GOOD Ideas for Cities Venice, Italy
Wednesday, August 29
4:00 to 7:00 p.m.
4:00 p.m. Program
6:00 p.m. Reception
The U.S. Pavilion at the Giardini
The 13th International Venice Architecture Biennale
Venice, Italy
Free and open to the public with admission to the Biennale, ticket information here\n
Generously supported by ArtPlace\n
The Challenges\n
1. Venice, made up of its many islands, is situated at the heart of a lagoon system that is rich in cultural heritage and wildlife. Yet modern infrastructure development and economic growth have brought the lagoon ecology and natural dynamics to the brink of collapse as well as threatening traditional livelihoods for residents. In what ways could the lagoon be brought back into the everyday life of Venice and considered an asset for the city without relegating it to being merely another tourist attraction?
Alessandro Tessari, ETB studio\n
Jane da Masto, We Are Here\n
2. Venice is being destroyed by its poor systems of garbage disposal and waste management. With foul smells and appearances, the canals of Venice are losing their charm as the filth has become more predominant—and infamous—than the beauty. How might the city create a different way of handling industrial waste, which would contribute to less water pollution and a greater overall sense of cleanliness and aesthetics in Venice?
Laura Candelpergher, Massimo Lepore, Raul Pantaleo, Simone Sfriso, STUDIO TAMASSOCIATI \n
Francesca Bortolotto Possati, CEO and Owner, The BAUERs\n
3. Venice has always been a melting pot of cultures, yet it is now populated by different communities that pass each other without really meeting: tourists, students, commuters and residents inhabit separate, parallel worlds that rarely merge. How can Venice’s transportation routes and connections be re-thought and re-created, within and beyond the city, to encourage interaction between different groups and promote new ways of encounter?
Saverio Panata, Spedstudio\n
Marco Zordan, Associazione 40XVenezia\n

Check out the videos from our other events and stay tuned for details about future GOOD Ideas for Cities announcements. If you'd like to talk about bringing the program to your city or school, email alissa[at]goodinc[dot]com or follow us at @IdeasforCities

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