Let's Fix It: Fall 2013, GOOD Magazine's (Re)design Issue

During one particular late-night editorial meeting, when all of us here at GOOD HQ probably had a few too many, we came up with an idea to draft six b

During one particular late-night editorial meeting, when all of us here at GOOD HQ probably had a few too many, we came up with an idea to draft six briefs, each detailing a specific global problem (the toilet, automobile, standardized test, single family home, condom, and Big Mac), and send them to a bunch of creative people with one simple instruction: to design a solution to the problem in less than 30 minutes, a time frame that would make them think about the problem, but limit the extent to which its complexity might overwhelm them.


The next morning, when we were no longer under the influence, we still liked the idea and the stir-crazy, logic-defying, head-spinning, half-hour, half-baked design challenge was born. It was the perfect centerpiece for an edition of the magazine dedicated to (re)design. When we sent out the briefs, we told each of our would-be designers (David Arquette, Robin Chase, Susie Essman, Mac Miller, Dana Goodyear, and Eric André, just to name a few) that it was okay if the solution they sent back to us was half-baked. Surprise, surprise: They were. Some were super-thoughtful. Some, to be perfectly frank, were mildly disturbing… But all of our challenges, in their own way, got their subject engaging creatively with a problem in search of a solution, and we think that's a good thing.

The (Re)design Issue tells a DIO (do-it-ourselves) design story that not only chronicles the ways in which design thinking is being deployed all over the world, but also calls you, the GOOD community, to take part in its deployment.

That DIO story is a thread that winds itself throughout the issue. It runs through Chelsea Roff's story about how you can redesign your well-being; it runs through our roundtable with GOOD's first-ever Global Exchange Fellows who are redesigning the way we think about neighborhoods; you hear it in Ralph Nader's recollections of the doomed Chevy Corvair on its 50th anniversary; you see it in Bethlehem Shoals' essay on the championship legacy of the NBA coaching collaboration of Phil Jackson and Tex Winter, who effectively redesigned teamwork; and we hope you will take part in it as you explore our 14-page feature on half-baked solutions.

For the designers among you, we expect you'll notice the (Re)design Issue pushing against the boundaries of what constitutes a "design problem." Our hope is that all of you begin thinking a little bit more like designers. We think our planet needs it.

Articles

He photographed Nazi atrocities and buried the negatives. The unearthed images are unforgettable.

He risked his life to leave a "historical record of our martyrdom."

via Yad Vashem and Archive of Modern Conflict, 2007

In September 1939, the Nazis invaded Poland. By April 1940, the gates closed on the Lodz Ghetto, the second largest in the country after Warsaw.

Throughout the war, over 210,000 people would be imprisoned in Lodz.

Among those held captive was Henryk Ross. He was a Jewish sports photographer before the Nazi invasion and worked for the the ghetto's Department of Statistics during the war. As part of his official job, he took identification photos of the prisoners and propaganda shots of Lodz' textile and leather factories.

Keep Reading Show less
Communities
via Imgur

Every few years there's something that goes mega viral because people can't decide what it is.

There was the famous "is it blue and black, or white and gold" dress?

There was the audio recording that said either "yanny" or "Laurel."

Keep Reading Show less
Viral


Rochester NY Airport Security passing insulting notes to travelers caught on tape www.youtube.com

Neil Strassner was just passing through airport security, something he does on a weekly basis as part of his job. That's when a contract airport security employee handed him a small piece of folded cardboard. Strassner, 40, took the paper and continued on his way. He only paused when he heard the security employee shouting back at him, "You going to open the note?"

When he unfolded the small piece of paper, Strassner was greeted with an unprompted insult. "You ugly!!!"

According to Strassner, and in newly released CCTV of the incident, the woman who handed him the note began laughing loudly.

Keep Reading Show less
popular
Creative Commons

National Tell a Joke Day dates back to 1944 when President Franklin Delano Roosevelt was having a meeting with Vice-President, Henry Wallace. The two men were tired and depressed due to the stress caused by leading a country through world war.

During a lull in the meeting, Wallace said, "Frank, to cheer you up I have a joke I'd like to share."

"Let's have it, Henry," Roosevelt replied while ashing his cigarette.

"Why did the chicken cross the road?" Wallace asked. "Not sure," Roosevelt replied.

"To get to the other side," Wallace responded.

Roosevelt laughed so hard that the bourbon he was drinking sprayed out of his nose and onto the floor of the oval office.

Keep Reading Show less
Culture
Photo by Annie Spratt on Unsplash

Coal mining is on the decline, leaving many coal miners in West Virginia without jobs. The Mine Safety and Health Administration says there are about 55,000 positions, and just 13,000 of those jobs are in West Virginia. The dwindling amount of work is leaving some struggling to make a living, but the Appalachian Beekeeping Collective is giving those coal miners a way to find new jobs and make a supplemental income as coal mining diminishes.

The Appalachian Beekeeping Collective trains coal miners and other low-income residents in mining communities to keep bees. Some coal miners are getting retrained to work in the tech industry, however beekeeping allows coal miners to continue to work in a job that requires a similar skill set. "The older folks want to get back to work, but mining is never going to be like it was in the '60s and '70s, and there is nothing to fall back on, no other big industries here, so all of these folks need retraining," former coal miner James Scyphers told NPR. "Beekeeping is hands-on work, like mining, and requires on-the-job training. You need a good work ethic for both."

Keep Reading Show less
Business