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Neighborhood Watch

-What did you want to be when you were just a wee pre-teen? Twelve-year-old David Fishman wants to critique restaurants for the Zagat Guide. A recently opened Italian spot in New York allowed him to bone up on his skills. -Members of Radiohead and Wilco are joining forces with ex-Crowded House frontman..


-What did you want to be when you were just a wee pre-teen? Twelve-year-old David Fishman wants to critique restaurants for the Zagat Guide. A recently opened Italian spot in New York allowed him to bone up on his skills.-Members of Radiohead and Wilco are joining forces with ex-Crowded House frontman Neil Finn for a reprise of his 2001 Seven Worlds Collide project. They'll record new music to benefit Oxfam, an organization battling poverty in more than 100 countries.-The Large Hadron Collider (a.k.a. "the Big Bang Machine") suffered an electrical malfunction in September. The 17-mile particle accelerator is going to take $21 million to fix and likely won't be officially online until the summer.-With the help of Interpol, five African countries just made the biggest wildlife crime bust in history: over a ton of illegal elephant ivory was seized. Here's to international cooperation.-From the GOOD Community: Spraygraphic posts an interview with the California-based artist Tocayo, whose colorful and detailed drawings take their inspiration from politics and architecture (and everything in between).(Image: A hairy, drippy Rahm Emannuel. Credit: Don Relyea. Via Computerlove.)
Articles
via Library of Congress

In the months after the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor in 1941, President Franklin D. Roosevelt authorized the military to move Japanese-Americans into internment camps to defend the West Coats from spies.

From 1942 to 1946, an estimated 120,000 Japanese Americans, of which a vast majority were second- and third-generation citizens, were taken in their homes and forced to live in camps surrounded by armed military and barbed wire.

After the war, the decision was seen as a cruel act of racist paranoia by the American government against its own citizens.

The interment caused most of the Japanese-Americans to lose their money and homes.

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Communities
via Michael Belanger / Flickr

The head of the 1,100-member Federal Judges Association on Monday called an emergency meeting amid concerns over President Donald Trump and Attorney General William Barr's use of the power of the Justice Department for political purposes, such as protecting a long-time friend and confidant of the president.

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Politics

North Korea remains arguably the most mysterious place on Earth. Its people and modern day customs are shrouded behind a digital and physical wall of propaganda. Many people in the United States feel that North Korea is our "enemy" but almost none of us have had the opportunity to interact with an actual person who lives in, or has lived under, the country's totalitarian regime.

Even more elusive is what life is like in one of North Korea's notorious prison camps. It's been reported that millions live in horrific conditions, facing the real possibility of torture and death on a daily basis. That's what makes this question and answer session with an escaped North Korean prisoner all the more incredible to read.

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Communities