GOOD
Articles

Picture Show: Tilt Shift Views of Massive Tourist Attractions

An odd paradox of growing up is that even though we get bigger (and, ideally, wiser), the world somehow gets more difficult to deal with. As we age, the scale of our problems seems to increase exponentially; meanwhile, our ability to regard our surroundings with wide-eyed wonder diminishes.

An odd paradox of growing up is that even though we get bigger (and, ideally, wiser), the world somehow gets more difficult to deal with. As we age, the scale of our problems seems to increase exponentially; meanwhile, our ability to regard our surroundings with wide-eyed wonder diminishes. In an effort to reclaim and celebrate that childlike sense of awe, Bryan Solarski uses an increasingly popular technique called tilt shift to photograph massive tourist attractions, from a sold-out hockey game in New York's Madison Square Garden to a bullfight in Madrid.


"I wanted to recreate the dreamlike feeling of actually being in these places in a playful way," says Solarski. "And I think tilt shift is popular right now (and was a good way to do that), because it gives the viewer a sense of being in a smaller world, a bit like the way the world looks to a kid."

What follows is a selection from Bryan Solarksi's "Little World."

Bullfight, Madrid, Spain

Madison Square Garden, New York City

Grand Canal, Venice, Italy

Beach One, Coney Island, New York City

Beach Two, Coney Island

Roman Ruins, Rome, Italy

Street Corner, Paris, France

Centre Pompidou, Paris

Beach Three, Almafi Coast, Italy

Musee Du Louvre, Paris

Bridges, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

The Guggenheim Museum, New York City

Vatican museum, Vatican City

Trending Stories