GOOD

Do Healthier School Lunches Curb Bad Behavior?

An ongoing experiment going on over the past 13 years or so in Appleton, Wisconsin, a town southwest of Green Bay, could make the strongest argument for healthy school lunches yet: Since the school district began switching from processed foods to more nutritional offerings, it's experienced a precipitous drop in all sort of deleterious behaviors, from drop outs to students carrying weapons.

Among the changes undertaken by school officials, Central Alternative High School Principal LuAnn Coenen told the blog WELL Said, were pulling vending machines stocked with soda out of their facilities and dumping burgers and fries in favor of water coolers and salad bars heaped with fresh fruits and vegetables. After the changes took place, the school no longer needed police on their grounds, as incidents of drug use, vandalism, and even student mental health issues all diminished (PDF).


The behavior of the students in Appleton is consistent with previous, more rigorous scientific studies that suggest that better school lunches improve student performance, says the WELL Said post:

Proof exists that reducing sugar and fat intake leads to higher IQ’s and improved grades in school. Stephen Schoenthaler, professor of criminal justice at California State University proved that much when he conducted a study on students at 803 low-income neighborhood schools in New York City. With a supervised change in the students’ diets, passing final exam grades went from 11% below the national average to 5% above it.

\n

The Appleton story underscores the potential value of programs like the Early Learning Challenge Fund, money cut out of the health care bill that would have been earmarked for providing support services (including those related to health and nutrition) for children five and under. By getting these kids access to healthier food options earlier in life, it could diminish some of the future behavioral problems seen in schools all around the country.

Here's a video documenting some of Appleton's early success:

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OYG4V_hogzI

via TreeHugger; Photo via

Articles
via Barry Schapiro / Twitter

The phrase "stay in your lane" is usually lobbed at celebrities who talk about politics on Twitter by people who disagree with them. People in the sports world will often get a "stick to sports" when they try to have an opinion that lies outside of the field of play.

Keep Reading
Culture

The Free the Nipple movement is trying to remove the stigma on women's breasts by making it culturally acceptable and legal for women to go topless in public. But it turns out, Free the Nipple might be fighting on the wrong front and should be focusing on freeing the nipple in a place you'd never expect. Your own home.

A woman in Utah is facing criminal charges for not wearing a shirt in her house, with prosecutors arguing that women's chests are culturally considered lewd.

Keep Reading

In August, the Recording Academy hired their first female CEO, Deborah Dugan. Ten days before the Grammys, Dugan was placed on administrative leave for misconduct allegations after a female employee said Dugan was "abusive" and created a "toxic and intolerable" work environment. However, Dugan says she was actually removed from her position for complaining to human resources about sexual harassment, pay disparities, and conflicts of interest in the award show's nomination process.

Just five days before the Grammys, Dugan filed a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, and her claims are many. Dugan says she was paid less than former CEO Neil Portnow. In 2018, Portnow received criticism for saying women need to "step up" when only two female acts won Grammys. Portnow decided to not renew his contract shortly after. Dugan says she was also asked to hire Portnow as a consultant for $750,000 a year, which she refused to do.

Keep Reading