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Education: Morning Roundup, Laura Bush Is Looking for Great Principals

Laura Bush announces principal-training effort, Obama's loner school year proposal faces reality, and the Gates Foundation targets college graduation.


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Morning Roundup:

From Education Week: Laura Bush Unveils Bold Principal-Training Initiative

Former first lady Laura W. Bush announced a new nationwide initiative today aimed at changing the way America’s principals are recruited and prepared—and how they run schools.

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From The Associated Press: Calls for longer school years face budget reality

President Barack Obama's call for a longer school day and year for America's kids echoes a similar call he made a year ago to little effect, illustrating just how deeply entrenched the traditional school calendar is and how little power the federal government has to change it.
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For many years, diversity in higher education has been measured by how many low-income students and students of color enroll in college. The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation wants to make a dramatic change in that definition, by focusing instead on college graduation rates.
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A group of the city's leading philanthropists, including billionaire Eli Broad and former mayor Richard Riordan, rallied Monday to save ICEF Public Schools, one of the nation's largest and most successful charter school companies, which was teetering on financial insolvency.
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Photo (cc) via Flickr user afagen\n
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