GOOD

Europe Can’t Stop Trolling Trump

They all just want to be second

It all started when Zondag met Lubach, a Dutch satirical show, put together a hilarious tourism ad for our new president , Donald Trump, presenting him with a very simple idea: Make the Netherlands second.


Now, with Trump’s first two weeks in office coming to a close, other European countries are getting in on the act.

Switzerland

First, a Swiss show named Deville Late Night put together a very similar video to the Dutch version, describing why they, Switzerland, should come second to America:

Using the same quippy, reality TV style as Trump, they lampooned his penchant for being terribly rude to women and showed them a little traditionally Swiss high fashion. But the European countries weren’t done there. Soon, Denmark jumped in with their own video.

Denmark

Their show, Natholdet, roasted our president, as well:

Dragging Trump’s executive orders and leveling years of environmental policy the video said, “We have modern super mills that produce nice, clean, renewable energy, don't worry. We can turn them into oil mills if you want. No problem!” Next, it was Germany’s turn.

Germany

Their late show, called Late Night show ZDF, couldn’t help but join in on the fun (jump past the introduction to get to the video at the [01:47] mark):

Finally, someone gave Germany the ability to joke openly about those two World Wars. As the clip jokes, "Germany hosted two World Wars in the last 100 years they were the best world wars in the world and we won both of them bigly, anyone who says anything else is fake news, period."

Belgium

Additionally, Trump gave the Belgian show “De Ideale Wereld” the opportunity they’ve been waiting for:

They’re Swedish, but still. "ABBA is the most famous Belgian band in history. Well, they're Swedish, but according to alternative facts they're Belgian. I swear."

Portugal

Portugal’s 5 Para a Meia-Noite also couldn’t help themselves:

The Portuguese went straight for the gut with this one, saying, "We abolished slavery in 1751—more than 100 years before the United States. Deal with it. And consider doing the same in your companies. Well, your sons’ companies.”

Lithuania

Not to be outdone:

Conflicts of interest notwithstanding, it looks as if the European world is finally getting their shot at a little schadenfreude of their own.

Articles
via Barry Schapiro / Twitter

The phrase "stay in your lane" is usually lobbed at celebrities who talk about politics on Twitter by people who disagree with them. People in the sports world will often get a "stick to sports" when they try to have an opinion that lies outside of the field of play.

Keep Reading
Culture

The Free the Nipple movement is trying to remove the stigma on women's breasts by making it culturally acceptable and legal for women to go topless in public. But it turns out, Free the Nipple might be fighting on the wrong front and should be focusing on freeing the nipple in a place you'd never expect. Your own home.

A woman in Utah is facing criminal charges for not wearing a shirt in her house, with prosecutors arguing that women's chests are culturally considered lewd.

Keep Reading

In August, the Recording Academy hired their first female CEO, Deborah Dugan. Ten days before the Grammys, Dugan was placed on administrative leave for misconduct allegations after a female employee said Dugan was "abusive" and created a "toxic and intolerable" work environment. However, Dugan says she was actually removed from her position for complaining to human resources about sexual harassment, pay disparities, and conflicts of interest in the award show's nomination process.

Just five days before the Grammys, Dugan filed a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, and her claims are many. Dugan says she was paid less than former CEO Neil Portnow. In 2018, Portnow received criticism for saying women need to "step up" when only two female acts won Grammys. Portnow decided to not renew his contract shortly after. Dugan says she was also asked to hire Portnow as a consultant for $750,000 a year, which she refused to do.

Keep Reading