The GOOD 100: Umair Haque

Dear Old People Who Run the World,

My generation would like to break up with you.Every day, I see a widening gap in how you and we understand the world-and what we want from it. I think we have irreconcilable differences.You wanted big, fat, lazy "business." We want small, responsive, micro-scale commerce.You turned "politics" into a dirty word. We want authentic, deep democracy-everywhere.You wanted financial fundamentalism. We want an economics that makes sense for people-not just banks.You wanted shareholder value-built by tough-guy CEOs. We want real value, built by people with character, dignity, and courage.You wanted an invisible hand-it became a digital hand. Today's markets are those where the majority of trades are done literally robotically. We want a visible handshake: to trust and to be trusted.You wanted growth-faster. We want to slow down-so we can become better.You didn't care which communities were capsized, or which lives were sunk. We want a rising tide that lifts all boats.You wanted to biggie-size life: McMansions, Hummers, and McFood. We want to humanize life.You wanted exurbs, sprawl, and gated anticommunities. We want a society built on authentic community.You wanted more money, credit, and leverage-to consume ravenously. We want to be great at doing stuff that matters.You sacrificed the meaningful for the material: You sold out the very things that made us great for trivial gewgaws, trinkets, and gadgets. We're not for sale: we're learning to once again do what is meaningful.There's a tectonic shift rocking the social, political, and economic landscape. The last two points above are what express it most concisely. I hate labels, but I'm going to employ a flawed, imperfect one: Generation "M."What does the "M" in "Generation M" stand for? First it's for a movement. It's a little bit about age-but mostly about a growing number of people who are acting very differently. They are doing meaningful stuff that matters the most. Those are the second, third, and fourth "M"s.Gen M is about passion, responsibility, authenticity, and challenging yesterday's way of everything. Everywhere I look, I see an explosion of Gen M businesses, NGOs, open-source communities, local initiatives, government.Who's Gen M? Obama, kind of. Larry and Sergey. The Threadless, Etsy, and Flickr guys. Ev, Biz and the Twitter crew. Tehran 2.0. The folks at Kiva, Talking Points Memo, and FindtheFarmer. Shigeru Miyamoto, Steve Jobs, Muhammad Yunus, and Jeff Sachs are like the grandpas of Gen M. There are lots more where these innovators came from.Gen M isn't just kind of awesome-it's vitally necessary. If you think the "M"s sound idealistic, think again.The great crisis isn't going away, changing, or "morphing." It's the same old crisis-and it's growing.You've failed to recognize it for what it really is. It is, as I've repeatedly pointed out, in our institutions: the rules by which our economy is organized.But they're your institutions, not ours. You made them-and they're broken.I was (kind of) kidding about breaking up before. Here's what it looks like to me: Every generation has a challenge, and this, I think, is ours: to foot the bill for yesterday's profligacy-and to create, instead, an authentically, sustainably shared prosperity.Anyone-young or old-can answer it. Generation M is more about what you do and who you are than when you were born. So the question is this: Do you still belong to the 20th century, or the 21st?Love,Umair HaqueHaque is the director of the Havas Media Lab and author of the website Edge Economy, from Harvard Business Publishing. He is a brand advisor and writer with thoughts on how companies can better serve our society. He wrote this manifesto a few months ago, and we couldn't say it better ourselves.Illustration by Will Etling


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WITI Milwaukee

Joey Grundl, a pizza delivery driver for a Domino's Pizza in Waldo, Wisconsin, is being hailed as a hero for noticing a kidnapped woman's subtle cry for help.

The delivery man was sent to a woman's house to deliver a pie when her ex-boyfriend, Dean Hoffman, opened the door. Grundl looked over his shoulder and saw a middle-aged woman with a black eye standing behind Hoffman. She appeared to be mouthing the words: "Call the police."

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Rochester NY Airport Security passing insulting notes to travelers caught on tape www.youtube.com

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A post on the Murdered by Words subreddit is going viral for the perfect way a poster shut down a knee-jerk "double-standard!" claim.

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Coal mining is on the decline, leaving many coal miners in West Virginia without jobs. The Mine Safety and Health Administration says there are about 55,000 positions, and just 13,000 of those jobs are in West Virginia. The dwindling amount of work is leaving some struggling to make a living, but the Appalachian Beekeeping Collective is giving those coal miners a way to find new jobs and make a supplemental income as coal mining diminishes.

The Appalachian Beekeeping Collective trains coal miners and other low-income residents in mining communities to keep bees. Some coal miners are getting retrained to work in the tech industry, however beekeeping allows coal miners to continue to work in a job that requires a similar skill set. "The older folks want to get back to work, but mining is never going to be like it was in the '60s and '70s, and there is nothing to fall back on, no other big industries here, so all of these folks need retraining," former coal miner James Scyphers told NPR. "Beekeeping is hands-on work, like mining, and requires on-the-job training. You need a good work ethic for both."

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Hermine Ricketts and Tom Carroll had been growing a front yard garden for 17 years, but in 2013, Miami Shores changed its city ordinance, making the activity illegal. The new city ordinance said that backyard vegetable gardens were a-OK, but Ricketts and Carroll couldn't keep a garden in their backyard because it didn't get enough sun. So the couple could either dig up their garden or face $50 in daily fines for letting it continue to grow. The couple opted to do neither and instead, they sued the city.

Ricketts and Carroll took their case to the Florida Supreme Court. Initially, the courts sided with Miami Shores, but the fight wasn't over. Florida State Senator Rob Bradley introduced legislation preventing "a county or municipality from regulating vegetable gardens on residential properties." Earlier this year, the Senate passed the bill 35-5.

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