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Pro Golfer Jason Day Had To Wait For A Fan To Pound A Beer To Get His Ball Back

The golfer couldn’t help but laugh at the absurdity of the situation.

While golf tournaments may be getting rowdier, at least according to some PGA tour members, the events still carry the reputation of being a little … stiff.

Of course, alcohol tends to loosen up many otherwise staid affairs, and attendees of the 2018 Masters got to enjoy a very unlikely encounter between star golfer Jason Day and an imbibing fan.


On his second shot on the first hole of the tourney, Day had a wayward hit end up in a spectator’s beer cup, splashing the surrounding fans and setting the stage for some odd circumstances between the golfer and the owner of the affected beer.

Not one to make waste, the fan pounded his beer before reaching into the cup and returning the errant ball to Day.

Serendipity aside, launching a first-hole shot into a fan’s beverage isn’t the best start to golf’s premier tournament, but Day was able to laugh off the absurdity of the situation.

For those wondering whether golf’s comically extensive rules apply to this unlikely circumstance, they do. Day was forced to play his own ball or risk a larger penalty. Fans are considered “part of the course” per the rulebook, so Day was afforded a free drop, albeit in a tricky spot. He bogeyed the hole and left one fan with a story he’ll be dining out on for years.

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