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Steve Jobs had the most hilarious response to a fan seeking his autograph in 1983 letter

While many often picture Steve Jobs as a genius, very few know of his ability to connect with people through humor.

Steve Jobs had the most hilarious response to a fan seeking his autograph in 1983 letter
Cover Image Source: Apple CEO Steve Jobs holds a new mini iPod at Macworld on January 6, 2004 in San Francisco. (Photo by Just | Getty Images)

While fans often dream of meeting their idol, not a lot of celebrities want to connect with them. Some go to great lengths to make time for their fans and Steve Jobs' letter from 1983 is proof of that. Steve Jobs’ hilarious response to a fan letter posted by @stem_feed on X is winning over the internet. When you see the little details, it will warm your heart too and tell you why Jobs was truly the man of the people. His gesture also shows why he inspired so many people across the world. The business magnate did several things for his fans in his own little ways.

Apple CEO Steve Jobs speaks at the Apple headquarters March 6, 2008 in Cupertino, California. Apple introduced a new iPhone software developers kit which enables 3rd party software developers to develop software for the iPhone. (Photo by David Paul Morris/Getty Images)
Image Source: Apple CEO Steve Jobs speaks at the Apple headquarters March 6, 2008 in Cupertino, California. Apple introduced a new iPhone software developers kit which enables 3rd party software developers to develop software for the iPhone. (Photo by David Paul Morris/Getty Images)

In 1983, a fan wrote Steve Jobs a letter asking him for his autograph. But Steve Jobs politely declined his request saying that he was sorry but he doesn’t sign autographs. Jobs is known to have declined several such requests in person and through mail. He mostly wrote out a response declining the request. But what caught the internet’s attention was how Steve Jobs had signed the letter with both of his initials in small letters, fulfilling his fan’s request indirectly. The typed-out letter read: "Dear M. Varon: I'm honored that you'd write, but I'm afraid I don't sighn autographs." The post went viral as people couldn’t stop pointing out the thoughtful letter.

CUPERTINO, CA - APRIL 08: Apple CEO Steve Jobs speaks during an Apple special event April 8, 2010 in Cupertino, California. Jobs announced the new iPhone OS4 software. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
Image Source: Apple CEO Steve Jobs speaks during an Apple special event April 8, 2010 in Cupertino, California. Jobs announced the new iPhone OS4 software. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

The mail also had Apple’s letterhead and was eventually auctioned for $479,939. People wrote on the X thread that he did give the fan an autograph after all, while others pointed out that there is a huge difference between an autograph and a signature. Others wrote that Steve Jobs was the original meme maker and super smart for coming up with such a response. Others also remembered him and the golden days of Apple, complaining that they don’t make it like he did anymore.



 

 



 

Apart from Apple, Steve Jobs is also known for the “Stay hungry, stay foolish” tagline he gave, inspiring people around the world to do what their heart desires and put their everything into achieving it. He also gave the concept of connecting the dots looking backward in one of his speeches where he explains how no experience ever goes to waste and somehow contributes to the full picture of your life. He gave the example of a calligraphy course he took that eventually helped him design Apple’s remarkable typeface. These interactions, and his passion for technology, have made him a popular face even outside the world of business and technology. No wonder someone wanted his autograph and thankfully for Jobs’ thoughtfulness, they didn’t have to come out completely empty-handed out of it. They might have gotten even a bit more than they asked for with the letter’s high value and the attention it’s receiving even after so many years. 



 

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