GOOD

Join Us for GOOD Ideas for Cities Portland on February 16

Our new event series pairing creative teams with urban challenges kicks off in Portland, Oregon on February 16.

How would you improve your city? Our new event series might give you some ideas.


GOOD Ideas for Cities taps creative problem-solvers to tackle real urban challenges and present their solutions at live events across the country. Thanks to our partnership with CEOs for Cities and a generous grant from ArtPlace, we're taking the program to five mid-sized cities in 2012, starting with Portland, Oregon. And we want you to join us.

Last year, we issued a call for creatives in Portland, and chose six teams to represent the city. Each team was issued a challenge proposed by a local urban leader. At the event, the creative teams will present their solutions to their assigned challenge, and the urban leaders will join them onstage for a brief Q&A with GOOD Ideas for Cities editor Alissa Walker. Afterwards, join us for drinks and more conversation as we discuss how to make these ideas a reality for Portland.

Thursday, February 16

Doors at 6:00 p.m.

Program begins at 7:00 p.m.

Ziba Auditorium

910 NW Marshall

Portland, OR 97209

The event is free; RSVP here.

UPDATE: Tickets are sold out for this event. If you'd still like to attend, there will be a line forming outside the venue starting at at 6:00 p.m. and we'll be releasing all unclaimed tickets at 6:45 p.m. Thanks for your support!

RSVPs do not guarantee admission after 6:45 p.m., so please arrive on time. Do not call Ziba about tickets; email alissa[at]goodinc[dot]com with any questions.

Hosted by Portland State University Graphic Design Department and Ziba


Supported by ArtPlace

Sponsored by AIGA Portland


Special thanks to our partners: Dill Pickle Club, Scout Books, ADX, Paul Searle, FORTPORT

Refreshments generously provided by Widmer Brothers Brewing and Ninkasi Brewing Company


The Challenges

1. Local schools must be supported by the community if they are to be successful. How can our neighborhoods, and institutions in them like businesses, work better to support youth, their educational outcomes and opportunities?


The Office of Mayor Sam Adams: Cary Clarke, Arts and Culture Policy Director; Lisa Libby, Planning and Sustainability Director; Kali Ladd, Education and Youth Policy Director


Wieden + Kennedy: Nick Barham, Eugenie Frerichs, Bernadette Spear, Seth Weisfield, Igor Clark, Patrick Nistler, Jamie Ostrov, Joseph Limauro, Matt Brown

2. Today one of every two adults in Multnomah County is overweight or obese. The way we build our cities is part of the problem. How might we re-think our public spaces to promote public health and more active lifestyles?


Department of Planning, City of Portland: Eric Engstrom, Principal Planner

Official Mfg. Co.: Mathew Foster, Jeremy Pelley, Fritz Mesenbrink

3. A reduction of the amount of meat and dairy in local diets could have a profound impact on the city's environmental footprint. How do we get the residents of Portland to consume less meat?

Sustainable Food Policy and Programs, City of Portland: Steve Cohen, Manager


Ideas for Cities from Ziba: Carl Alviani, Ryan Coulter, Steve Lee

4. Local businesses are hesitant to set up shop in some areas located outside of Portland's city center. How do we help nurture a stronger, more competitive business climate in Lents Town Center?


Portland Development Commission: Kevin Cronin, Senior Program Manager
 and Shawn Ulman, Public Affairs Manager

Team ADX: Building a Community of Thinkers and Makers: Eric Black, Kelley Roy, Greg Simons, Sean Barrow, Simon Yuen, Sarah Thilman, Tyesha Snow, Iain Thatcher, Max Miller

5. Portland is known worldwide as a bike town; yet we have stalled when it comes to infrastructure. How might we create a major new bikeway that helps make bicycling as visible, safe, convenient, and pleasant for as many people as possible?


Bike Portland: Jonathan Maus, Founder


THINK.urban: Jason King, Allison Duncan, Katrina Johnston

6. Local farmers are reporting that they are working more markets yet making less money. How do we increase access to fresh locally grown food while ensuring profitability for our region’s farmers?

Portland Farmers Market: Trudy Toliver, Executive Director


Sincerely Interested: Nicole Lavelle, Sarah Baugh, Justin Flood

Stay tuned for details about our next GOOD Ideas for Cities in St. Louis on March 8. Please get in touch if you'd like to talk about bringing the program to your city—email alissa[at]goodinc[dot]com or follow us at @IdeasforCities

Articles
via Douglas Muth / Flickr

Sin City is doing something good for its less fortunate citizens as well as those who've broken the law this month. The city of Las Vegas, Nevada will drop any parking ticket fines for those who make a donation to a local food bank.

A parking ticket can cost up to $100 in Las Vegas but the whole thing can be forgiven by bringing in non-perishable food items of equal or greater value to the Parking Services Offices at 500 S. Main Street through December 16.

The program is designed to help the less fortunate during the holidays.

Keep Reading Show less
Communities

For more than 20 years. Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME) has served the citizens of Maine in the U.S. Senate. For most of that time, she has enjoyed a hard-fought reputation as a moderate Republican who methodically builds bridges and consensus in an era of political polarization. To millions of political observers, she exemplified the best of post-partisan leadership, finding a "third way" through the static of ideological tribalism.

However, all of that has changed since the election of Donald Trump in 2016. Voters in Maine, particularly those who lean left, have run out of patience with Collins and her seeming refusal to stand up to Trump. That frustration peaked with the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court.

Keep Reading Show less
Politics
via Truthout.org / Flickr and Dimitri Rodriguez / Flickr

Bernie Sanders' presidential campaign looks to be getting a huge big shot in the arm after it's faced some difficulties over the past few weeks.

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, a leading voice in the Democratic parties progressive, Democratic Socialist wing, is expected to endorse Sanders' campaign at the "Bernie's Back" rally in Queens, New York this Saturday.

Fellow member of "the Squad," Ilhan Omar, endorsed him on Wednesday.

Keep Reading Show less
Politics
Photo by HAL9001 on Unsplash

The U.K. is trying to reach its goal of net-zero emissions by 2050, but aviation may become the biggest source of greenhouse gas emissions in the U.K. by that same year. A new study commissioned by the Committee on Climate Change (CCC) and conducted at the Imperial College London says that in order for the U.K. to reach its target, aviation can only see a 25% increase, and they've got a very specific recommendation on how to fix it: Curb frequent flyer programs.

Currently, air travel accounts for 2% of global greenhouse gas emissions, however that number is projected to increase for several reasons. There's a growing demand for air travel, yet it's harder to decarbonize aviation. Electric cars are becoming more common. Electric planes, not so much. If things keep on going the way they are, flights in the U.K. should increase by 50%.

Nearly every airline in the world has a frequent flyer program. The programs offer perks, including free flights, if customers get a certain amount of points. According to the study, 70% of all flights from the U.K. are taken by 15% of the population, with many people taking additional (and arguably unnecessary) flights to "maintain their privileged traveler status."

Keep Reading Show less
The Planet