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These 6 Female Illustrators Were Just Hired To Remake Beer Company’s Sexist Beer Ads

Alcohol companies are starting to realize that sexist ads are turning off their fastest-growing consumer base

Studies show that women are drinking beer more than ever before. So alcohol companies are starting to realize sexist ads are turning off their fastest-growing consumer base. Plus, as more men are waking up to the reality of sexism, beer ads featuring scantily clad women are looking increasingly more outdated by the day. That’s why a Brazilian beer company is apologizing for its sexist past with a new ad campaign that attempts to empower women.


A new video released by Skol beer called “Reposter” opens with the the Brazilian company ripping up old its print ads featuring woman in swimsuits. “These images are part of our past … but the world has evolved, and so has Skol. This doesn’t represent us anymore,” the video says. It then reveals a new campaign where six female illustrators have come together to rework Skol’s old sexist ads into new posters. The new artwork features confident women with traditional Brazilian features and body types drinking beer on their own terms.

“I accepted this project because I think it’s important to deconstruct stereotypes, preconceived notions,” said Criola, one of Skol’s new artists. “One thing I wanted to do was take the woman away from the role of the person serving the beer. Now, she is drinking the beer,” artist Elisa Arruda added. Adweek applauds Skol’s efforts at making “sexism look tired” and for owning “its own problematic past.” Let’s hope their campaign is a success and other brewers follow suit.

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