GOOD

New Jalapeño Bred Specifically to Hold More Cheese

New Mexico's Chile Institute has hybridized a bell pepper and a regular jalapeño in order to create a bigger popper.


Scientists at New Mexico State University's nonprofit Chile Pepper Institute recently announced that they had successfully bred a brand new, medium spicy, extra large jalapeño, specially optimized for "increased cheese payload."

The Institute's Director, Paul Bosland (who, incidentally, is credited by the Guinness Book of Records with the discovery of the world's hottest chile, the Bhut Jolokia, in 2005) explained that the new jalapeño is named NuMex Jalmundo, which is "a contraction of jalapeño and the Spanish word for world (mundo), implying that it is as big as the world."


The jumbo chile emerged from a hybridization between a bell pepper (Keystone Resistant Giant) and a regular-sized jalapeño (of the Early Jalapeno varietal), and was specifically created to respond to American consumer demand for ever larger, cheesier, and meatier jalapeño poppers, a popular stuffed, breaded, and deep-fried appetizer or bar snack.

While I admire the ingenuity and business acumen of Bosland and team, I can't help thinking this is probably not a positive step forward in food design, at least in terms of America's waistlines. Popper fans (among which I do not number myself), what do you think? Is space for a little more cheese in your deep-fried jalapeño good news, or bad?

Articles
via National Nurses United/Twitter

An estimated eight million people in the U.S. have started a crowdfunding campaign to help pay for their own or a member of their household's healthcare costs, according to a survey released Wednesday.

The poll, which was conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) at the University of Chicago, also found that in addition to the millions who have launched crowdfunding efforts for themselves or a member of their household, at least 12 million more Americans have started crowdfunding efforts for someone else.

Keep Reading
Health
via Library of Congress

In the months after the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor in 1941, President Franklin D. Roosevelt authorized the military to move Japanese-Americans into internment camps to defend the West Coast from spies.

From 1942 to 1946, an estimated 120,000 Japanese Americans, of which a vast majority were second- and third-generation citizens, were taken from their homes and forced to live in camps surrounded by armed military and barbed wire.

After the war, the decision was seen as a cruel act of racist paranoia by the American government against its own citizens.

The internment caused most of the Japanese-Americans to lose their money and homes.

Keep Reading
Communities

Step by step. 8 million steps actually. That is how recent college graduate and 22-year-old Sam Bencheghib approached his historic run across the United States. That is also how he believes we can all individually and together make a big impact on ridding the world of plastic waste.

Keep Reading
The Planet