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Yad Vashem

Since 1992, the Jewish Foundation for the Righteous has been holding reunion ceremonies between Holocaust survivors and rescuers once a year. But the tradition is coming to an end, as many have died or are too frail to travel. What might be the last reunion of its kind took place when a 92-year-old woman met up with the two surviving family members that she helped hide during the Holocaust, and their descendants.

Sarah Yanai and Yossi Mor introduced Melpomeni Dina (nee Gianopoulou) to their almost 40 family members, all decedents of the Mordechai family, the family of seven that Dina and her two sisters hid during WWII. "There are no words to describe this feeling," Dina told the Jeruselum Post. "It is very emotional for us to be together again."

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via The Obama Foundation

Cancel culture, call-out culture, hashtag activism, clicktivism … are all names for how people are publicly shamed by social media mobs. This can lead to damaging their careers and reputations.

Call-outs can be effective at bringing the wrongs committed by public figures to light. It worked to create public awareness about the serious sexual misconduct of R. Kelly, Harvey Weinstein, and Bill O'Reilly.

But it has also made pariahs out of people who did something good but were found to have some skeletons in their social media closet.

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Facebook

We think of Instagram as a place to post artsy photos of our salads or see jealousy-inducing photos of our friend's vacations. But something more insidious has been lurking on our feeds: false information. Two weeks ago, the Senate Intelligence Committee called Instagram the "most effective tool" in manipulating elections on its report on interference in the 2016 election. In order to prepare for the 2020 election, and for the onslaught of propaganda, Instagram is launching a new feature – a false information label that will make fake news easier to detect.

If you share something that might not be true, you'll get a pop up saying, "Independent fact-checkers say this post includes false information. Your post will include a notice saying it's false. Are you sure you want to share?" You can still share it, but the post will bear the false information label.

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Culture

October is domestic violence awareness month and when most people think of domestic violence, they imagine mostly female victims. However, abuse of men happens as well – in both heterosexual and homosexual relationships. But some are taking it upon themselves to change all that.

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via Andi-Graf / Pixabay

The old saying goes something like, "Possessions don't make you happy." A more dire version is, "What you own, ends up owning you."

Are these old adages true or just the empty words of ancient party-poopers challenging you not to buy an iPhone 11? According to a new study of 968 young adults by the University of Arizona, being materialistic only brings us misery.

The study examined how engaging in pro-environmental behaviors affects the well-being of millenials. The study found two ways in which they modify their behaviors to help the environment: they either reduce what they consume or purchase green items.

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via Jimmy Kimmel / YouTube

Fake news is rampant on the internet. Unscrupulous websites are encouraged to create misleading stories about political figures because they get clicks.

A study published by Science Advances found that elderly conservatives are, by far, the worst spearders of fake news. Ultra conservatives over the age of 65 shared about seven times more fake information on social media than moderates and super liberals during the 2016 election.

Get ready for things to get worse.

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