GOOD

5 Best Lunches In the World

Banish your sad desk salad for good

For the past few years, crafty food blogs have been pushing the Mason jar salad. You layer your salad with dressing on the bottom, followed by the denser vegetables, then greens or assorted foliage, and any more fragile ingredients at the top. Then you take it to work, shake and enjoy. It’s simple, and we don’t mind it once in awhile, but it got us thinking about the ways people carry food, and the tips and tricks we can steal from these international packs.

Photo courtesy Instagram user @sakuracafe001


BENTO BOX (JAPAN)

Pretty much a classic lunchbox, the bento dates back to the Song Dynasty (960-1279), taking its name from an old Mandarin slang word meaning convenient. In Japan, it became popular during the Edo Period (1603-1867), and today, bento culture has spread far and wide. There are many different kinds of bento box, from a tray-like box with separated wells to a tiered box with fancy lacquered designs.

PRO TIP: Sprinkle furikake—a dry mix of dry fish, seaweed, sesame, sugar, and MSG (it’s fine, we promise)—over the rice to up your bento game.

DOSIRAKTANG (SOUTH KOREA)

South Koreans eat a lunch from something called a dosiraktang, which, like a bento box, is varied. Sometimes, it’s a tin can full of rice, shredded seaweed, egg, and kimchi. Like a mason jar salad, the dosirak can be shaken and then eaten as a mixed up meal—a bit like a shaken bibimbap. Nowadays, there are tiered lunchboxes to separate the banchan (side dishes) like kimchi and kombu (kelp).

PRO TIP: Most Korean tiered lunchboxes contain a thermos tier for soup. Soup is a necessity at nearly every home-cooked meal in South Korea, and it’s calming to have a nice warm drink for lunch.

TIFFIN CARRIER (THAILAND, INDIA, ET CETERA)

The tiffin carrier seems to be the most prevalent lunchbox in the world, used all over South Asia. They are commonly made from aluminum, have a convenient handle on top for easy transport, and are tiered to hold different parts of the meal. (Think rice on the bottom, pickles in the middle, and a meat dish on top.)

PRO TIP: If you get a four-tiered tiffin carrier, you can stash a dessert or something crunchy such as papadums (thin Indian crisps) in the top.

AGELGIL (ETHIOPIA)

Agelgil is a traditional Ethiopian food basket. Often the outside is covered in sheepskin, and it will have handy straps that allow it to be worn like a backpack. Inside, it is stuffed with injera bread (a spongy flatbread, usually made from teff) with a meat dish, such as tibs (a stir-fry meets stew), folded into the breads.

PRO TIP: As with the hardworking farmer of yore, meet your loved one with an agelgil and hand-feed them—an intimate act known as gursha.

Photo courtesy Instagram user @brightbrands.ph

BAON (PHILIPPINES)

The Filipino version of the bento is a bit simpler. Usually it has three spaces: one for rice, one for pickles, and one for a meat dish such as beef tapa (cured beef).

PRO TIP: Throw a fried egg on top of the rice for an extra bit of protein (and deliciousness).

Food

In the category of "claims to fame nobody wants," the United States can now add "exporter of white supremacist ideology" to its repertoire. Super.

Russell Travers, acting director of the National Counterterrorism Center, made this claim in a briefing at The Washington Institute in Washington, D.C. "For almost two decades, the United States has pointed abroad at countries who are exporters of extreme Islamist ideology," Travers said. "We are now being seen as the exporter of white supremacist ideology. That's a reality with which we are going to have to deal."

Keep Reading Show less

Since the International Whaling Commission banned commercial whaling in 1986, whale populations have been steadily recovering. However, whales in the wild still face other dangers. In the summer of 2018, four Russian companies that supply aquariums with marine animals captured almost 100 beluga whales and killer whales (aka orcas). After a public outcry, those whales are swimming free as the last of the captive whales have been released, the first time this many captured whales have been released back into the wild.

In late 2018 and early 2019, a drone captured footage of 11 orcas and 87 beluga whales crammed into holding pens in the Srednyaya Bay. The so-called "whale jail" made headlines, and authorities began to investigate their potentially illegal capture.

Keep Reading Show less
The Planet

An anonymous White House official claims President Trump cruelly limited Hispanic immigrants in their new book, "A Warning."

The book, to be released on November 19, gives an alleged insider account of the Trump White House and paints a picture of the president as a chaotic man who lacks the mental and moral acumen required for the job.

The anonymous staffer says that Trump once feigned a Hispanic accent and made fun of women attempting to immigrate to the U.S.

Keep Reading Show less
Politics
via Gage Skidmore / Flickr

The 2020 election is a year away, but Donald Trump has some serious ground to cover if he doesn't want it to be a historical blowout.

A Washington Post- ABC News poll released Tuesday shows that Trump loses by double digits to the top Democratic contenders.

Vice President Joe Biden (56%-39%); Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts (54%-39%); Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont (56%-39%); South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg (52%-41%); and Sen. Kamala Harris of California (52%-41%) all have big leads over the president.

Keep Reading Show less
Politics
Yad Vashem

Since 1992, the Jewish Foundation for the Righteous has been holding reunion ceremonies between Holocaust survivors and rescuers once a year. But the tradition is coming to an end, as many have died or are too frail to travel. What might be the last reunion of its kind took place when a 92-year-old woman met up with the two surviving family members that she helped hide during the Holocaust, and their descendants.

Sarah Yanai and Yossi Mor introduced Melpomeni Dina (nee Gianopoulou) to their almost 40 family members, all decedents of the Mordechai family, the family of seven that Dina and her two sisters hid during WWII. "There are no words to describe this feeling," Dina told the Jeruselum Post. "It is very emotional for us to be together again."

Keep Reading Show less
Culture