GOOD

Push for Good: This Week's Guide to Crowdsourcing Creative Progress

With our Push for Good series, we have identified crowdfunding opportunities for the GOOD community to get behind. Now we are also shining a light on crowd-doing opportunities—so you can join others in working towards the greater good with actions as well as donations. Here's our weekly round-up of our favorite projects from the crowdsourced world.


Crowdsourced Activity

Make Cleaning City Parks Fun: Join a Clean-up Group

GOOD member Dave Whiteside lives in Waterloo, Ontario and has organized a group that meets to hang out, exercise, and clean up city parks. It's such a great idea that we think it would be great if you created your own clean-up group. Add it to your To-Do list.

Crowdsourced Letters

Bring More Trees into Los Angeles

Do you want more trees by your local schools and hang-outs to provide clean air for us all? Los Angeles-based non-profit Tree People wants to help. Call them—or, better yet, write them a letter, with drawings from kids at your local school.

Crowdsourced Signatures

Honor a Female Architect That Didn't Get the Recognition She Deserved

In 1991, the Pritzker Architecture Prize Committee failed to acknowledge female architect Denise Scott Brown for her contributions to the field, instead choosing to award her firm's male co-partner, Robert Venturi. Sign this petition in support of recognizing Denise Scott Brown.

Crowdsourced Resources and Skills

Offer Your Video Editing and Translation Skills

GOOD member and self-governance collective Freelab is creating video guides about how to operate solidarity economies effectively. Why? Their goal is to help build stronger communities that can support one another and live off the land. They just need translators and video editors to make it work. Read more about their work and add pro bono creative work to your To-Do list.

Crowdfunding Opportunities

10 Days to Go: Recycling Detroit Before it Gets Demolished

Since Detroit filed for bankruptcy, design company Holstee is working with Reclaim Detroit to collect wood from abandoned buildings before they get demolished. Now, they're making frames.

11 Days to Go: An Animated Film Made with Hands-On Creativity

Filmmaker and creator of Lift Animation, Rachel Johnson, was born with a physical disability, but it never stopped her from being creative. In fact, it has fueled the creation of a lot of her stop-motion animated films. This film tells the story of Herietta Bulkowski, who learns to use her creativity to explore the world despite a curved spine that prevents her from seeing the sky. A film made entirely by hand with wires, clay, and paper, Henrietta Bulkowski shows how beautiful a film can be when made with sourced materials. Read more from associate producer Adele Han Li.

24 Days to Go: A Documentary About Unresolved Journalist Killings in Peru

This documentary tells the story of an unresolved murder case involving a group of journalists killed by villagers in Peru. Read more from one of their close colleagues, Carmen Valdivieso Hubert.

Handmade Bags Stitched By Syrian Women Widowed or Displaced by War

Matar is an online shop offering goods made by widowed Syrian women displaced by war who use their beautiful embroidery skills to make a living.

Click here to add crowdsourced projects you can care about to your To-Do list.

Illustration by Jessica De Jesus

Articles

A two-minute television ad from New Zealand is a gut punch to dog lovers who smoke cigarettes. "Quit for Your Pets" focuses on how second-hand smoke doesn't just affect other humans, but our pets as well.

According to Quitline New Zealand, "when you smoke around your pets, they're twice as likely to get cancer."

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Health
via Bossip / Twitter

Sens. Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders took aim at former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg onstage at Wednesday's Las Vegas Democratic debate, likening the billionaire businessman to President Donald Trump and questioning his ability to turn out voters.

Sanders began by calling out Bloomberg for his stewardship of New York's stop and frisk policy that targeted young black men.

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Politics
via United for Respect / Twitter

Walmart workers issued a "wake up call" to Alice Walton, an heir to the retailer's $500 billion fortune, in New York on Tuesday by marching to Walton's penthouse and demanding her company pay its 1.5 million workers a living wage and give them reliable, stable work schedules.

The protest was partially a response to the company's so-called "Great Workplace" restructuring initiative which Walmart began testing last year and plans to roll out in at least 1,100 of its 5,300 U.S. stores by the end of 2020.

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Communities