The 2016 GOOD 100

Editorial director Caroline Pham interrogates what it means to truly do “good” today.

An interesting debate arose in the course of making this issue: the merits of doing “right” versus the merits of doing “good.” In the third iteration of The GOOD Dinnertime Conversation—this time gathering nine individuals working on refugee issues in Berlin—our guests deliberate: What is the difference? Which should we strive for? The group comes to the consensus that one should generally aim to do what is right—but with the understanding that this isn’t always black and white, that what seems right in the moment can sour down the road. Still, this possibility, this uncertainty, should not prevent us from taking action.

Asked why she started assisting refugees with emergency relief organization Moabit hilft, Mareike Wenzel’s answer is simple—she saw a need so she did something about it. It’s this impressive sense of urgency that we’re celebrating in our fifth installment of the GOOD 100, which honors people who are acting right now, tackling pressing global issues in extraordinary and innovative ways.


Photo by Fabian Brenneke

There’s Betsy Reed, The Intercept’s incisive editor-in-chief holding government and big business accountable through deep-dive investigative journalism, and Rolof Mulder, the visionary whose micro-medical facilities enable rapid-response healthcare in war-torn areas. Photographer Jessica Lehrman (“The Center Cannot Hold,”) offers us a visceral look at the promising era of activism in which we find ourselves, while Charlene Carruthers takes us behind the scenes of a nationwide campaign to mobilize and empower black youth. And our very own Jed Oelbaum travels to Ohio to dig into what drives Syrian archaeologist and historian Amr Al-Azm (“One Foot in the Levant,”), a man trying to save his homeland’s cultural history from half a world away. Neither these individuals nor the 95 others you’ll learn about in the ensuing pages, are doing this work for the accolades—which is precisely why they deserve all the more recognition.

I’ll share one final insight from our dinner guests in Berlin, one that I believe is particularly apt to introduce this issue. To enact any sort of change requires venturing out of our comfort zones. The moment we settle in, content with the way things are, is the moment we should realize we aren’t doing enough. It may be daunting, but it’s imperative that we take that first step, whatever it may be.

Features

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Except that's apparently not true at all. A major study from Cigna on loneliness found that feelings of isolation and loneliness are on the rise amongst Americans but the numbers are nearly identical amongst those who use social media and those who don't. Perhaps more importantly, the study found five common traits amongst those who don't feel lonely.

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He photographed Nazi atrocities and buried the negatives. The unearthed images are unforgettable.

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via Yad Vashem and Archive of Modern Conflict, 2007

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Throughout the war, over 210,000 people would be imprisoned in Lodz.

Among those held captive was Henryk Ross. He was a Jewish sports photographer before the Nazi invasion and worked for the the ghetto's Department of Statistics during the war. As part of his official job, he took identification photos of the prisoners and propaganda shots of Lodz' textile and leather factories.

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WITI Milwaukee

Joey Grundl, a pizza delivery driver for a Domino's Pizza in Waldo, Wisconsin, is being hailed as a hero for noticing a kidnapped woman's subtle cry for help.

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Rochester NY Airport Security passing insulting notes to travelers caught on tape www.youtube.com

Neil Strassner was just passing through airport security, something he does on a weekly basis as part of his job. That's when a contract airport security employee handed him a small piece of folded cardboard. Strassner, 40, took the paper and continued on his way. He only paused when he heard the security employee shouting back at him, "You going to open the note?"

When he unfolded the small piece of paper, Strassner was greeted with an unprompted insult. "You ugly!!!"

According to Strassner, and in newly released CCTV of the incident, the woman who handed him the note began laughing loudly.

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Facebook: kktv11news

A post on the Murdered by Words subreddit is going viral for the perfect way a poster shut down a knee-jerk "double-standard!" claim.

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Most people would see the story as something positive. A dad goes out of his way to learn a skill that makes his daughter look fabulous.

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