GOOD

The Fashion Issue

Joshua Neuman prods our layered relationships with clothing and consumption.

Not too long after we decided to dedicate an issue to exploring our relationship with clothes, a book crossed our path that seemed to encapsulate much of our thinking on the subject, while also challenging many of our core assumptions. Worn Stories by Emily Spivack is a collection of some 60 odd, clothing-inspired narratives from an array of cultural figures and storytellers that testify to the incredible role clothes can play in our lives. When reading the book in the context of the damaging effects of fast fashion and its eco-friendly alternatives, we noticed ourselves thinking a lot less about the clothes we ought to consume and much more about the relationship we ought to have with our clothing. The book has sage advice for our times: Stop your shopping spree, slow down, and learn to develop real relationships with the clothing you wear. We here at GOOD are clearly not the first to wonder whether fashion might be following the way of the slow food movement, but reading Worn Stories, we found a bold and prophetic path that could lead us in that direction.

We were tickled silly when Spivack agreed to guest edit GOOD’s first-ever fashion issue. She set the tone for the issue by inviting a group of her friends in and around the fashion industry to speculate about the murky future of fashion in our second GOOD Dinnertime Conversation.


Photo by Jessica Yatrofsky

Spivack also conceived of a fashion story that aims to turn the sweat on our clothing into a badge of honor instead of a mark of shame (“The Human Stain”).

[new_image position="standard large" id="null"]Photo by Christine Hahn[/new_image]

And shame might also come to mind when you think of the ankle monitor, but Rob Walker traces the counter-history buried within the punitive technology and wonders whether it might increasingly be used as a force for good (“When Bleeding Edge has a Bleeding Heart”).

Photo by Zora Murff

Allen Salkin also turns to history, revisiting the paper clothing trend of the 1960s and hypothesizing that the solution to fast fashion might lie in an even faster form of fashion (“Who Killed Paper Clothing?”).

Photo by Sera Lindsey

In new fiction by Aimee Bender, we enter a vintage store where clothing has the power to communicate so much more than style, a place where William Blake might have seen a world in a button (“The Memory Store”).

Photo by Scottie Cameron

We hope that our cover story, a conversation between transgender icons Zackary Drucker and Hari Nef (“As We Are”), functions as a rejoinder to an issue devoted to exploring who we are and what we wear. After all, who we really are depends on what’s within.

Photo by Luke Gilford

Features
via David Leavitt / Twitter

Anyone who has ever worked in retail knows that the worst thing about the job, right after the pay, are the unreasonable cheapskates who "want to talk to your manager" to get some money off an item.

They think that throwing a tantrum will save them a few bucks and don't care if they completely embarrass themselves in the process. Sometimes that involves belittling the poor employee who's just trying to get through their day with an ounce of dignity.

Twitter is rallying around a gal named Tori who works at a Target in Massachusetts after she was tweet-shamed by irate chapekate, journalist, and Twitter troll, David Leavitt.

Keep Reading
Business

Childbirth is the number one reason American women visit the hospital, and it ain't cheap. In fact, it's getting more and more expensive. A new study published in Health Affairs found that the cost of having a baby with employer-sponsored health insurance increased by almost 50% in the past seven years.

The study evaluated "trends in cost-sharing for maternity care for women with employer-based health insurance plans, before and after the Affordable Care Act," which was signed into law in 2010. The study looked at over 657,061 women enrolled in large employer-sponsored health insurance plans who delivered babies between 2008 and 2015, as these plans tend to cover more than plans purchased by small businesses or individuals.

Keep Reading
Health

A meteorite crashed into Earth nearly 800,000 years ago. The meteor was 1.2 miles wide, and the impact was so big, it covered 10% of the planet with debris. However, scientists haven't been able to find the impact site for over a century. That is, until now. A study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences journal believes the crash site has been located.

Tektites, which are essentially rocks that have been liquefied from the heat of the impact and then cooled to form glass, help scientists spot the original impact site of a meteor. Upon impact, melted material is thrown into the atmosphere, then falls back to the ground. Even if the original crater has disappeared due to erosion or is hidden by a shift in tectonic plates, tektites give the spot away. Tektites between 750,000 to 35.5 million years old have been found in every continent except Antarctica.

Keep Reading