GOOD

Dutch gymnast Bart Deurloo has been getting attention for all the wrong reasons this year, having made headlines in March for hitting his groin against the pommel horse during an American Cup performance and, more recently, giving the crowd at the 2017 World Championships a scare after crashing to the ground unexpectedly.

This week’s incident took place not during the competition, but rather during a training session. The video, below, seems to corroborate his account that he may have blacked out during the routine, as strange and terrifying as that sounds.


The video features an interview with Deurloo post-fall, though it’s difficult to ascertain, since he has no recollection of the mishap, whether his collapse from the high bar was the cause or an effect of a head issue. He says:

“I think I blacked out a little bit. I don’t remember, did I hit the ground? I remember that I didn’t catch it … I think it’s okay. I have a little bit headache. It’s nothing big or anything. All of the doctors came to me and asking what’s wrong.”

Days later, Deurloo afforded all competitors a chance to redo their floor routines after falling due to a dead spot on the floor.

Though Deurloo was the final gymnast of six to compete on the floor routine, when his assertion of a faulty surface was confirmed, all competitors were given the chance to re-attempt their floor routines, though Deurloo himself declined the opportunity, citing damage to his body from the high bar fall earlier in the week and the finals in that event on Sunday. He spoke of the broken floor following his performance.

Earlier this year, Deurloo found himself the subject of a viral video after hitting his groin against the pommel horse during his competition routine at the American Cup in New Jersey.

Clearly, this guy’s had a rough year in 2017, but he appears no worse for the wear. Let’s hope the finals this weekend in Montreal treat him a little better than past events, and if he garners attention in the media, it’s for his success and not another misfortune.