GOOD

The first victory for Sen. Bernie Sanders came in his home state of Vermont. Super Tuesday is shaping up to be a dramatic showdown between Sanders and his new chief rival, former Vice President Joe Biden. Sanders has maintained a lead in the Democratic primary over the past few weeks but the establishment wing of the Democratic Party swiftly moved to unite behind Biden after his commanding South Carolina victory last weekend.


Many Sanders supporters are upset by what they see as the corporate and ineffective wing of the party moving behind a candidate who has appeared shaky at best on the campaign trail and on the debate stage. With the one unifying theme of the primary being a desire to defeat Donald Trump, Sanders supporters have argued that their candidate is the only one with the passion and conviction to take on a president who has shaken off all the historic norms of the office.

However, a tough Super Tuesday battle with Joe Biden (and the Democratic Party establishment) may be just what Bernie Sanders needs. After all, any fight against Donald Trump, Republicans and the conservative media will be an endless fight through election day. So far, Sanders has been relatively unscathed by his primary opponents. His biggest obstacle has been receiving fair and equal coverage by a political press that has actively been dismissive if not hostile to his campaign. An increased focus on the differences between a candidate like Biden and Sanders will force Bernie and his supporters to develop an even more precise approach to his campaign, something he'll need if he emerges as the nominee.