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Interactive Infographic: Can America Be Energy Independent?

One of the key issues this election season is America's dependence on oil. Is drilling the answer? Find out where we get oil and what we do with it.



This infographic is a collaboration between GOOD and Other Means, with support from MTV

As the election season kicks off, GOOD and MTV want to cut past all the blustering, pontificating, and finger pointing to get to the heart of some of the most important issues that America is facing today. It's 2012 and as a nation, we've reached a pivotal point for determining the road to our future. Can we transition to be more energy independent? How do we create long term job growth? What would really happen if we had a national healthcare plan, enacted immigration reform and adjusted the tax laws?

Join us every Wednesday for the next two months, when we'll be graphically exploring these questions and more with interactive infographics that go behind the issues. Today, we're launching with one of key issues that underpins our environmental and economic future: energy independence. Are we able to end our love affair with foreign oil? Which countries are the key stakeholders in our oil imports and can we find sources of energy domestically? Find the answers and more here.

Infographics
via The Hill / Twitter

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via David Leavitt / Twitter and RealTargetTori / Twitter

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