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Anti-vaxxers cursed at ER staff who helped their son because he was 'isolated' to protect others

via Reddit

When parents choose not to vaccinate their children, they are taking what they believe to be calculated risk: to protect my child from a vaccination injury, such as autism, I will put them at risk of developing a host of diseases, including measles, tetanus, mumps, polio, hepatitis B, and diphtheria.

They also choose to put others, especially babies that are too young to be immunized, at risk of life-threatening illnesses.

This reasoning is incredibly selfish given the fact that there is absolutely no evidence that vaccinations cause autism.


A recent study of over 650,000 children published earlier this year found that the MMR vaccine didn't increase the risk of autism.

doc / fickr

Entitled parents of an unvaccinated boy who was taken to the emergency room are the perfect example of this type of selfish disregard for the health of others.

RELATED: Anti-vaxx mom asks how to protect her daughter from measles outbreak. The internet delivered.

After their son fell on the playground and needed emergency attention, medical staff at the hospital isolated the child in the ER so he didn't infect any of the immunocompromised patients.

The doctor recommended that the child receive a tetanus shot to protect himself and others, but the parents declined.

According to a pamphlet created by the Centers for Disease Control, "If You Choose Not to Vaccinate Your Child, Understand the Risks and Responsibilities," the medical staff was correct in isolating the child.

The people who help your child can take precautions, such as isolating your child, so that the disease does not spread to others. One group at high risk for contracting disease is infants who are too young to be fully vaccinated. For example, the measles vaccine is not usually recommended for babies younger than 12 months. Very young babies who get measles are likely to be seriously ill, often requiring hospitalization. Other people at high risk for contracting disease are those with weaker immune systems, such as some people with cancer and transplant recipients.

The child ended up having surgery but was ultimately fine.

RELATED: Enlisted anti-vaxxer tried to skip on a flu shot for his newborn and the Navy schooled him for it

The parents thanked the medical staff who helped their son by flipping them off for isolating him to protect the health of others.

via Reddit

"We had come to the ER after an emergency with my son falling at the playground. We were questioned about our vaccine choices, then it was brought up 3 times how we should give him a tetanus shot and then 6 hours into our visit we were isolated in a room with gowns and gloves so we didn't "infect" any of immunocompromised patients. Our response. Our bub is ok, had a little surgery and he is on the mend for a great recovery."

The photo went viral on Reddit where the parents were harshly criticized.

"They don't trust a doctor to vaccinate, but they'll trust a doctor to perform surgery...? I really don't understand the logic." — Reizo123

"How fucking embarrassingly stupid it will be dying of tetanus in this day and age." — pimpolho_saltitao

"Methinks some of these parents are more motivated by rebelliousness." — Thecuriousblackbird

"Lol. Gotta [pray] for recovery because he isn't vaccinated." — L4HSR4M

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