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Intermission: A Coffee Shop Made Out of Shipping Crates

Starbucks is taking recycling to the next level.

While recycling typically means using reusable bags and throwing trash in the blue bin instead of the gray one, a new Starbucks in Seattle has created an entire store from four old shipping containers.

The Starbucks officially opened in mid-December off Interstate 5 in Tukwila, according to Inman News. Spokesman Alan Hilowitz told the website the store will contribute to reducing the company's overall carbon footprint.

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Click through to see the company turned repurposed shipping crates into a trendy, eco-friendly, coffee shop.


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Photos courtesy of Starbucks' Tom Ackerman via Inman News and Inhabitat\n
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Seventy-five years ago, on January 27, 1945, the Soviet Army liberated the Auschwitz concentration camp operated by Nazi Germany in occupied Poland.

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The vast majority of the inmates were murdered in the gas chambers while others died of starvation, disease, exhaustion, and executions.

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In a move that feels like the subject line of a spam email or the premise of a bad '80s movie, online shopping mogul Yusaku Maezawa is giving away money as a social experiment.

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